The Fault In Our Stars – discussion post

So, people, Mini-Me basically ordered me to read this book, and The Book Accumulator had me order it for him so he could get it in English without stupid postage charges, and then I forgot to give it to him. So clearly my stars were telling me to get my act together and read it.

tfios

First impressions: these kids are witty, and I love their conversation, but so far, so another teenage cancer-ridden love story. See similar misery novels: My Sister’s KeeperElsewhere, Before I Die.

I like the humour, the conversations are funny, but then I had An Issue With This Book: Augustus. He talks like no 17-year-old I’ve ever met. He talks like no man I’ve ever met. I know some quite humorous (can’t believe I just tried to spell that humourous and I had to rely on WordPress to tell me it was wrong) young women who can get about that many words per minute in amusing streams of consciousness out, but no men. I’m not trying to generalise here, find me an erudite loquacious teenage boy, never mind teenage cancer-surviving boy, and I will eat my metaphorical hat. Or an actual one, if you find me a hat made of chocolate. (melty).

And when I cannot believe the conversational talent of one of the main couple, things are Not Going To Go Well.

Or so I thought – I’ve read another 70 pages and have sort of accepted it but it’s still bugging me. But now they’re in Amsterdam and drinking the stars and falling in love but it’s cute and complex and not totally sugar-laden because Hazel thinks of herself like a grenade and… stuff. Themes. Things that English teachers like to discuss.

 

Also, in unrelated news, today I finished the audit that would not die.

highest of fives

For those reading this on an email – I request the highest of fives. Funnier with the accompanying clip of Barney Stinson from How I Met Your Mother requesting the five.

 

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7 thoughts on “The Fault In Our Stars – discussion post

  1. Ned 19 February 2013 at 6:38 pm Reply

    So I have been rereading John Green today, because I was on an Edinburgh train for four hours, so this is relevant to my interests. If you can stick it out, I would, because the novel is kind of aware it’s Yet Another Cancer Book, and tries to deal with that. And there’s more to learn about Gus, too, but the voice is mostly what it is.

    Green is really good at laugh-out-loud sentence construction, and he’s not going to dumb down his vocab just because his characters aren’t quite adults, and I just found myself taking it with a pinch of salt!

    Having reread two others today, I’d say my biggest criticism of TFiOS is that he’s still rewriting his first book, which means he’s written it four times now! But it’s a fun ride all the same, and if you’re the best at ploughing your furrow, why not, eh?

    • readingwithtea 19 February 2013 at 6:56 pm Reply

      I’m definitely going to stick it out because I love the humour; I didnt’ take it on the tube with me today because I have just got to Major Heart-Ache Realisation Number 1 and I wasn’t confident the book would let me get to work and back with my mascara intact.
      And you’re right, it is aware that it is Yet Another Cancer Book – the healthy disrespect the kids have for Cancer Perks etc is a good way of dealing with it and it feels like there is a bit more here than some of the others I’ve read and mention above – maybe because the protagonists are that bit older.

  2. booksandharps 21 February 2013 at 8:55 pm Reply

    Rory Gilmore being an excellent example for the young women who intelligently a mile a minute. Maybe Augustus is a long-lost relation of the Gilmores? *wishful thinking* Can the erudite loquacious teenage boy also have a driver’s license and be able to carry a harp? *more wishful thinking* Sadly, I think you have a point, even though a chocolate hat sounds great. Sending you the highest of fives from Germany! xx

    • readingwithtea 21 February 2013 at 10:44 pm Reply

      You do know that the Gilmore are a fictitious family, right?

      • Mini-Me 23 February 2013 at 10:22 am

        Yes, I know. But seeing as Augustus is also ficticious, surely fictional families can have fictional family drama! I like to amuse myself by coming up with crossover stories.

      • readingwithtea 23 February 2013 at 10:43 am

        You’re strange. But ok.

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