The Mystery of the Christmas Pudding – Agatha Christie – 6/10

(found lurking in the drafts folder)

 

“But Lady Chatterton was one of the brightest jewels in what Poirot called le haut monde. Everything she did or said was news. She had brains, beauty, originality and enough vitality to activate a rocket to the moon.”

christmas puddingThis is the first Agatha Christie I’ve read since I was about 14; a collection of 5 Poirot short stories and one Miss Marple investigation as well. Poirot investigates a sinister note about a plum pudding, the discovery of a jealous husband in a chest, an overheard quarrel leading to murder, the mysterious changes in a dead man’s eating habits, and a victim who dreamt of his own suicide. Miss Marple tags along for an investigation at Greenshaw’s Folly.

As much as I loved the character of Poirot, the way he is a bit snobbish, a bit difficult, but generally is warm-hearted and lovable, I found his ability to solve a crime with clues which weren’t passed onto the reader a bit frustrating.

And Miss Marple? I’ve never read any of hers (although I’m currently listening to an audiobook in which she stars) but she hardly seemed to take part in her own mystery! She let everyone work themselves all up and then suddenly everyone turned to her and she showed them the solution. A beautiful solution it was too, and I think that’s why Christie is as famous as she is – the puzzles she sets are often simple and neat if you know the right way in.

I’m struggling to review this one. Possibly because as I write, I’m watching Michael Hussey play Test cricket for the last time, and it’s all a bit emotional. Anyways. This was a pleasant enough read, each story engrossing and tightly told. Excellent airport reading.

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3 thoughts on “The Mystery of the Christmas Pudding – Agatha Christie – 6/10

  1. Jo 29 January 2013 at 6:50 am Reply

    Christie short stories just hit the mark sometimes. Difficult to review without giving the whole thing away.

  2. [...] This collection of 12 short stories, predominantly featuring Lord Peter Wimsey and Montague Egg, are a gentle introduction to Ms. Sayers’ writing. Each is neatly self-contained and the answer revealed in a gentlemanly flourish without arrogance (such as that of M. Poirot). [...]

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